Cameramakers missed the Wi-Fi bandwagon on the road to obsolescence - Macworld

Cameramakers missed the Wi-Fi bandwagon on the road to obsolescence - Macworld

The day of the standalone digital camera has passed for all but professional photographers and those who aren’t paid for their work but have particular needs a phone’s built-in camera can’t meet. Early smartphone cameras were of often terrible quality but convenient—now they’re both terrific and convenient. And I’ve talked to many professional photographers for whom a smartphone isn’t a replacement for their DSLRs or mirrorless cameras, lenses, and flashes, but a supplement—a choice that they can reach for, and sometimes reach for first. Cameramakers had a window of time that stretched over 10 years during which they could have proven their relevance to casual and somewhat more serious photographers. I’ve been writing regularly, sometimes constantly, about Wi-Fi since 2000, and ever since about 2005 or so, when extremely tiny, low-power Wi-Fi radios became available, I’ve been beating a drum about wireless photo transfer. Cameras started to ship that year with rudimentary Wi-Fi, sometimes in the most expensive models and often in modest ones. In 2008, I covered the new Nikon S52c for PCWorld, one of the best consumer cameras of the time that included Wi-Fi, and its horrible limitations.

RELATED ARTICLES

GIVE YOU BEST ARTICLE

Is technology spoiling your workout?...

READ MORE

GIVE YOU BEST ARTICLE

Daylight saving time: Set clocks...

READ MORE

SEE MORE RESULTS

sony automatic time set clock radio

READ MORE